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Sexual Misconduct and Relationship Violence

Introduction

The University of Tennessee Health Science Center’s campuses in Memphis, Knoxville, Chattanooga and Nashville are committed to creating and maintaining a learning, living, and working environment free from Sexual Misconduct, Relationship Violence, Stalking, and Retaliation. Those prohibited types of conduct will not be tolerated and will be grounds for disciplinary action up to, and including, permanent dismissal from the University and termination of employment. 

Sexual Misconduct, Relationship Violence, Stalking, and Retaliation are collectively referred to in this policy as Prohibited Conduct. This policy: (1) describes Prohibited Conduct; (2) explains multiple options for reporting Prohibited Conduct; (3) sets forth the procedures the University will follow for promptly, thoroughly, and equitably investigating and resolving reports of Prohibited Conduct in order to eliminate Prohibited Conduct, prevent their recurrence, and address their effects on Complainants or the University community; (4)identifies resources for students and employees, including Complainants; (5)outlines the University’s prevention and awareness programs relating to Prohibited Conduct; and (6) implements the requirements of Title IX, Title VII, and the Clery Act with respect to Prohibited Conduct.

Scope and Applicability and Jurisdiction

This policy applies to the conduct of and protects:

  • Students of the University of Tennessee Health Science Center campuses (Memphis, Chattanooga, Knoxville, and Nashville);
  • Employees of the University of Tennessee Health Science Center (Memphis, Chattanooga, Knoxville, and Nashville); and
  • University volunteers, University contractors, and third parties participating in a University program or activity

This policy applies regardless of the Complainant’s or the Respondent’s sex, sexual orientation, or gender identity. Prohibited Conduct can be committed by anyone (regardless of sex, sexual orientation, or gender identity), can occur between strangers or acquaintances, and can occur between people of the same or of different sexes, gender identities, and/or sexual orientations.

The University’s jurisdiction concerning by students committed away from University-controlled property is outlined in the CenterScope. With respect to employees and other non-students, this policy applies to conduct which: (i) occurs on University-controlled property; (ii) occurs in the context of a University employment or education program or activity; and/or (iii) occurs outside the context of a University employment or education program or activity, but has continuing adverse effects on University-controlled property or in any University employment or education program or activity.

Care and Support for Complainants

This section of the policy outlines a variety of University and external resources and measures relating to Prohibited Conduct. In addition to the information provided in this section, information concerning options for Complainants following a Sexual Assault can be found at: https://rainn.org/get-information/sexual-assault-recovery. 

There are campus resources and measures in Knoxville and Chattanooga for UTHSC students

Title IX Coordinators

The University is a recipient of federal financial assistance for education activities, and in accordance with the provisions of Title IX, all of its education programs and activities are subject to the prohibition against Sex Discrimination. The University’s Non-Discrimination Statement prohibits Sex Discrimination in any University education program or activity, including employment and admissions. Title IX applies to all students, employees, applicants for admission or employment, volunteers and visitors at the University and prohibits unequal treatment on the basis of sex including Sexual Harassment, Sexual Assault, and Sexual Exploitation, which are all types of Sex Discrimination.

Reports or complaints of Sex Discrimination, Prohibited Conduct, or questions about the University’s policies, procedures, resources, or programs concerning any of those issues, may be directed to the University’s Title IX Coordinator or one of the University’s Deputy Title IX Coordinators. The responsibilities of the Title IX Coordinator and the Deputy Title IX Coordinators are summarized below and are described in more detail in other sections of this policy. The Title IX Coordinator and the Deputy Title IX Coordinators generally are available Monday – Friday on University business days from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm. 

The term “Title IX Official” in this Policy means the Title IX Coordinator, a Deputy Title IX Coordinator, or one of their designees.

Michael Alston, EdD
Title IX Coordinator
Assistant Vice Chancellor for Equity, Diversity and Student Rights
Office of Equity and Diversity
910 Madison, Suite 826
Memphis, TN 38163
901.448.2112 (main) or 901.448.2133 (direct)
901.448.1120 (fax)
malston@uthsc.edu

In fulfilling those responsibilities, the Title IX Coordinator is assisted by four trained Deputy Title IX Coordinators who also are accessible to members of the University community for consultation and assistance.

  • Cindy Russell, Deputy Title IX Coordinator for Faculty: 901.448.6158; 400 O.W. Hyman Building, Memphis, TN 38163
  • Chandra Alston, Deputy Title IX Coordinator for Staff: 901.448.1955; 910 Madison, 7th floor, Memphis, TN 38163
  • Dustin Fulton, Deputy Title IX Coordinator for Students: 901.448.2110; 910 Madison, Suite 312, Memphis, TN 38163
  • Connie Childs, Deputy Title IX Coordinator for International Programs: 901.448.8484; 910 Madison, Rm 105, Memphis, TN 38163
  • Aaron Haynes, Deputy Title IX Coordinator for GME Administration: 901.448.5364; 920 Madison, Suite 447, Memphis, TN 38163
  • Carolyn Smith, Deputy Title IX Coordinator for Clery Compliance: 901.448.6450; 740 Court Ave. Rm 111, Memphis, TN 38163
Prohibited Conduct

This policy prohibits the following conduct defined below:

  • Sexual MisconductSexual Assault
  • Nonconsensual Sexual Penetration
  • Nonconsensual Sexual Contact
  • Sexual Harassment
  • Sexual Exploitation
  • Relationship ViolenceDating Violence
  • Domestic Violence
  • Relationship Violence Crime
  • Stalking
  • Retaliation
Reporting Prohibited Conduct and Mandatory Reporters

The University encourages Complainants of Prohibited Conduct, and others who are aware of Prohibited Conduct, to promptly report the incident to the University and/or to law enforcement.

This policy describes two options for informing someone about Prohibited Conduct:

  1. Report Prohibited Conduct to a University "Mandatory Reporter" (described in Section III.A)
  2. Report Prohibited Conduct to UTHSC-PD or local law enforcement (described in Section III.B); and/or

Those options are not mutually exclusive; in other words, a Complainant may pursue one or both of those options. This policy describes both options in detail so that members of the University community can make informed choices about whether and how to report Prohibited Conduct.

Mandatory Reporters are required to report information they receive about Prohibited Conduct. The University strongly encourages employees and students who are not Mandatory Reporters to report any information about Prohibited Conduct to one of the reporting options described in Section III.AComplainants are not required to report Prohibited Conduct to the University if they do not want the University to respond to the incident or assist with Interim Measures. However, reporting a violation of this policy to the University empowers Complainants to obtain the support they need and enables the University to respond appropriately, including conducting a prompt, thorough, and equitable investigation and, if warranted, taking disciplinary action against a Respondent. If a person reports an incident of Prohibited Conduct to the University, there is no requirement that the Complainant pursue criminal prosecution or University discipline against a Respondent. The University recognizes that a Complainant's decision on how to proceed after a report is filed is a process that may unfold over time; thus, at the time a report is made to the University, a Complainant does not have to decide whether to request any particular course of action.

This policy requires certain University employees, called Mandatory Reporters, to report information they receive concerning Prohibited Conduct to the University in accordance with Section VI. Not all University employees are Mandatory Reporters. Some University employees are encouraged but are not obligated to disclose Prohibited Conduct to the University. Other University employees, called Confidential Employees (Section IV.A.1), are legally or ethically prohibited from disclosing Prohibited Conduct to the University.

The only way for a Complainant (or any other person) to provide notice to the University of an incident of Prohibited Conduct is to report the incident to a Mandatory Reporter. A Complainant may opt to report an incident of Prohibited Conduct to a Mandatory Reporter but decline to disclose the identity of the Respondent; in that case, the University will offer Complainant Interim Measures, but the University's ability to investigate the incident and pursue disciplinary action against the Respondent or take other remedial action will be limited. If an incident is not reported to a Mandatory Reporter, then the University will not be able to take steps to: identify resources for the Complainant, such as Interim Measures; or promptly, thoroughly, and equitably investigate the incident and/or resolve the situation in order to eliminate the Prohibited Conduct, prevent its recurrence, and address its effects on the Complainant or the University community.

Because Mandatory Reporters have an obligation to report information they receive about Prohibited Conduct (and take other responsive actions), one of the purposes of this Section III.A is to inform students, employees and other persons about which University employees are Mandatory Reporters so that students, employees and other persons can make informed decisions about whether to disclose information to those University employees. Whether an employee is a Mandatory Reporter will vary based on factors such as the status of the Complainant and the Respondent (i.e., whether they are students, employees, and/or persons who are neither students nor employees) and the employee's authority to address violations of this policy. Appendix B identifies the University's Mandatory Reporters. Questions concerning whether a particular employee is a Mandatory Reporter should be directed to the Title IX Coordinator.

Mandatory Reporters are not confidential University resources like the Confidential Employees identified in Section IV.A.1. However, subject to a Complainant's request for confidentiality (Section III.A.5) and applicable legal disclosure obligations (Section III.E), information communicated to a Mandatory Reporter will initially be shared only within the limited circle of those University employees whom the University reasonably needs to involve in the University's response to an incident of Prohibited Conduct. Subsequently, information about the report will be shared only as reasonably necessary with investigators, witnesses, and the Respondent, subject to a Complainant's request for confidentiality and applicable legal disclosure obligations. Mandatory Reporters who are not employees of UTHSC-PD will not share information with UTHSC-PD or any other law enforcement agency without a Complainant's written consent, in accordance with FERPA.

The reporting options in this section also are available to a Reporter who is not a ComplainantAn employee-Complainant’s report of Prohibited Conduct that alleges Sex Discrimination committed by an employee-Respondent generally must be filed within 300 days of the alleged discriminatory action. In certain circumstances, however, at the discretion of the Title IX Coordinator, a report communicated to the University outside of that time limit may be investigated.  The University does not limit the time frame for reporting an incident of Prohibited Conduct committed by a Respondent who is not an employee, although a delay in reporting may impact the University’s ability to: obtain evidence; conduct a prompt, thorough, and equitable investigation; and/or otherwise respond and take appropriate action (e.g., the Respondent may no longer be affiliated with the University).

 

Mandatory Reporters for Student Complainants

This Section III.A.1 describes the non-law enforcement options for a Complainant who is a University student to report Prohibited Conduct to the University. 

A Complainant who is a student is encouraged to report Prohibited Conduct to one of the following University employees, who are Mandatory Reporters:

  • Title IX Coordinator or the Office of Equity & Diversity
  • Deputy Title IX Coordinators

A complainant who is a student may also report Prohibited Conduct to one of the University's other non-law enforcement Mandatory Reporters:

  • Office of Equity and Diversity
  • Office of Student Affairs
  • Office of Student Life
  • Chancellors, Vice Chancellors, Associate Vice Chancellors, or Assistant Vice Chancellors
  • Deans, Associate Deans, Assistant Deans, Executive Directors, Directors, Associate Directors, Assistant Directors, or Department Heads
  • Faculty members
  • Staff members
  • Academic advisors
  • Faculty and staff advisors to registered student organizations
  • Residency Coordinators
  • The Complainant's University employment supervisor (only if the Complainant is a University student employee or trainee)
  • The Respondent's University employment supervisor (only if the Respondent is a University employee, including a University student employee and trainee)
  • The Associate Vice Chancellor of Human Resources (only if the Respondent is a University employee, including a student employee)
  • All UTHSC employees
  • A University employee designated as a Campus Security Authority for Clery Act compliance
Mandatory Reporters for Employee Complainants

Respondent is not a University Student
A Complainant who is a University employee has four non-law enforcement options to report Prohibited Conduct to the University when the Respondent is not a University student (e.g., the Respondent is a University non-student employee):

  • Title IX Coordinator or the Office of Equity & Diversity
  • The Complainant's supervisor
  • The Respondent's supervisor (if the Respondent is a University employee)
  • The Associate Vice Chancellor of Human Resources


Respondent is a University Student
A Complainant who is a University employee has eight non-law enforcement options to report Prohibited Conduct to the University when the Respondent is a University student:

  • Title IX Coordinator or the Office of Equity & Diversity
  • The Complainant's supervisor
  • The Respondent's supervisor (if the Respondent is a University employee)
  • The Associate Vice Chancellor of Human Resources
  • Deputy Title IX Coordinators
  • Deputy Title IX Investigators
  • Office of Student Affairs
  • Office of Student Life
Reporting Options for Other Complainants
The Title IX Coordinator (or the Office of Equity & Diversity) is the only non-law enforcement option for a Complainant who is neither a University student nor a University employee to report a violation of this policy to the University.
What to Expect after Reporting Prohibited Conduct to a Mandatory Reporter
After receiving a report of Prohibited Conduct (either directly from a Reporter or indirectly from a Mandatory Reporter), the Title IX Coordinator, a Deputy Title IX Coordinator, a Deputy Title IX Investigator, or Deputy Title IX Intake Coordinator will initiate immediate and appropriate steps by the University to: have an appropriate University employee offer to meet with, or otherwise communicate with, the Complainant; in cases of Sexual Assault, Relationship Violence, and Stalking, provide a Complainant with a copy of this policy and/or another written publication approved by the Title IX Coordinator to inform the Complainant of the Complainant’s rights under this policy (if that has not already been done by a Mandatory Reporter); evaluate whether Interim Measures need to be implemented and assist with the implementation of Interim Measures; and, subject to a Complainant’s request for confidentiality (Section III.A.5), initiate the investigation and resolution procedures outlined in Section V of this policy if, based on an initial assessment, the alleged conduct meets the definition of Prohibited Conduct. The Title IX Coordinator or Deputy Title IX Coordinator also can assist a Complainant in reporting the incident to law enforcement.
Confidential Community Resources – Memphis

Memphis/Shelby County-area resources available 24 hour/7 days a week

You may choose to consult a private physician or go to an emergency department of your choice. As a result, a report to a private physician or emergency department does not put the University of Tennessee on notice of Sexual Misconduct or Relationship Violence.

Confidential Community Resources – Knoxville

Knoxville area resources available 24 hour/7 days a week


In order to better serve its students, the University has entered into a Memorandum of Understanding with the Sexual Assault Center of East Tennessee (SACETN).  The primary mission of the SACETN is to provide excellent and compassionate services for survivors of sexual assault and to empower communities through education and social change. The SACETN is a service of the Helen Ross McNabb Center. A Complainant does not have to report a sexual assault to law enforcement in order to receive services from the SACETN. 

SACETN has four program areas: Sexual Assault Nurse Examinations; Advocacy; Therapy; and Education and Outreach. Three of those program areas are described in more detail below.

Sexual Assault Nurse Examinations
Sexual Assault Nurse Examinations. A Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner (SANE) is available 24/7, 365 days a year to provide forensic nursing to sexual assault crime victims ages 13 and older. SANE exams can be performed at a local hospital or at SACETN. All services provided by the SACETN are free, including no-cost SANE exams, pregnancy prevention, and testing and preventative treatment for sexually transmitted infections.

Advocacy
The advocacy program of the SACETN provides victims of sexual assault with the support, information, and resources needed throughout the recovery process. Advocates work to ensure that Complainants' legal rights are protected, while also empowering Complainants to make their own decisions. Advocacy assistance includes: accompaniment during SANE exams, police interviews, legal appointments, and University and court proceedings; and assistance filing victim's compensation applications and petitions for orders of protection.

Therapy
Therapy services are available to Complainants in crisis, Complainants who are victims of a recent sexual assault, and Complainants who were victims of a sexual assault or sexual abuse that happened months or years ago. The goal of the SACETN is to work collaboratively to address the many concerns and issues associated with sexual violence in order to promote healing. Therapists at the SACETN specialize in treating female, male, and LGBTQ Complainants and offer services to individuals of all ages.

University of Tennessee Medical Center
1924 Alcoa Highway
http://www.utmedicalcenter.org/
865-305-9000


NOTE: The University of Tennessee Medical Center is a separate legal entity from the University of Tennessee. As a result, a report to the University of Tennessee Medical Center does not put the University of Tennessee on notice of Prohibited Conduct.

Confidential Community Resources – Chattanooga

Both of these offices can assist with orders of protection and legal issues surrounding violence for free or low cost.

Confidential Community Resources – Nashville

Nashville Crisis Hotline 615.244.7444

Suicide Prevention Lifeline800-SUICIDE 1.800.784.2433
This hotline is a network of 161 crisis centers in 50 states and will connect you with the crisis center nearest to your location.

Davidson County Mobile Crisis Team: 615.726.0125

VU Psychiatric Hospital: 615.327.7000

Sexual Assult

Drug and Alcohol

  • Alcoholics Anonymous Referral Service and Treatment Program 24-Hour Helpline: 1.800.711.6375
  • Narcotics Anonymous Helpline: 1.800.677.1462 or 615.251.7462
  • Drug Helpline: 1.800.662-4357

Intimate Partner Violence

You may choose to consult a private physician or go to an emergency department of your choice. As a result, a report to a private physician or emergency department does not put the University of Tennessee on notice of Sexual Misconduct or Relationship Violence.

Confidential Resources – UTHSC

If a Complainant does not desire action by the University and would like the details of the incident to be kept confidential, but desires to confide in someone, the Complainant may speak with the following persons, who are called "Confidential Employees" for purposes of this policy:

  • University Health Services can be of service by calling 901.448.5630 (day time) or 901.541.5654 (evening/weekends).
  • Student Behavioral Health at 901.448.5064): Student Behavioral Health Services, which is part of UHS, can provide emotional support for the victim as well as maintain confidentiality. A counselor is available at all times. Medical and psychological follow-up is available as long as needed.
  • Student Academic Support Services and Inclusion (SASSI) offers free counseling and other student support at 901.448.5056 or http://www.uthsc.edu/sassi/counseling/index.php

A Professional employee, such as a physician, psychologist, psychiatrist, counselor, CARE Navigator, or social worker, identified in this section, is a Confidential Employee only if the Complainant is communicating as if they are a patient or client. The designation of “Confidential Employee” can also include non-professional employees (i.e., staff, student-trainees or student-employees) or advocates who work or volunteer in on-campus health centers or a student support services area under the supervision of a person with a professional license. For instance, a class professor or clinical preceptor, who happens to be a physician or psychiatrist, would not be a Confidential Resource because such conversations would be part of an academic course of instruction and not for purposes of professional medical treatment or counseling. All faculty members are Mandatory Reporters.

Confidential Employees may periodically report non-personally identifiable information about Prohibited Conduct to the Title IX Coordinator to keep the Title IX Coordinator informed about the general extent and nature of Prohibited Conduct on and off campus.

Non-Confidential Resources – UTHSC

The university employees/units identified below are trained to support Complainants. While not bound by confidentiality (i.e., they are Mandatory Reporters who are required to report knowledge of incidents of Prohibited Conduct to the university and/or take other responsive action), these university employees/units will maintain the privacy of information shared by complainants within the limited circle of those University employees involved in the University’s response to an incident of Prohibited Conduct. When speaking with one of the resources below, complainants are free to limit the details they share while they decide whether to report an incident to the university. 

The following University employees/units are generally available Monday-Friday from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm on university business days unless otherwise specified below:

  • Michael Alston, UTHSC Title IX Coordinator: 901.448.2112; 920 Madison Avenue Suite 825, Memphis, TN 38163
  • Cindy Russell, Deputy Title IX Coordinator for Faculty: 901.448.6158; 400 O.W. Hyman Building, Memphis, TN 38163
  • Chandra Alston, Deputy Title IX Coordinator for Staff: 901.448.1955; 910 Madison, 7th floor, Memphis, TN 38163
  • Dustin Fulton, Deputy Title IX Coordinator for Students: 901.448.2110; 910 Madison, Suite 312, Memphis, TN 38163
  • Connie Childs, Deputy Title IX Coordinator for International Programs: 901.448.8484; 910 Madison, Rm 105, Memphis, TN 38163
  • Aaron Haynes, Deputy Title IX Coordinator for GME Administration: 901.448.5364; 920 Madison, Suite 447, Memphis, TN 38163
  • Carolyn Smith, Deputy Title IX Coordinator for Clery Compliance: 901.448.6450; 740 Court Ave. Rm 111, Memphis, TN 38163

UTHSC Campus Police Department: (24 hours/day, seven days/week) 901.448.4444

Please contact UTHSC Campus Police if you would like a UTHSC police officer to take you either to a local hospital or the University Health Services for medical treatment, including a sexual assault nurse examination.
Consent

Consent (or Consensual)
Consent is an affirmative and voluntary agreement by a person to engage in a specific sexual act.

Consent Must Be Obtained
Consent must be obtained, and the responsibility for obtaining Consent rests with the individual who voluntarily and physically initiates a specific sexual act, even if the other person initiated the sexual encounter. One’s own use of alcohol, drugs, or other substances does not diminish one’s responsibility to obtain Consent from the other person. Moreover, another person’s use of alcohol, drugs, or other substances does not diminish one’s responsibility to obtain Consent from that person.

Consent Must Be Affirmative
Consent must be affirmative, which means that Consent is communicated only through words and/or non-verbal actions that convey a clear agreement to engage in a specific sexual act. Whether person has communicated an agreement to engage in a specific sexual act generally is evaluated from the perspective of what a Reasonable Person who perceived the individual’s words and/or non-verbal actions would have understood; however, in the context of a long-term relationship between persons that has involved sexual activity and a pattern of communicating Consent, whether Consent has been communicated may be evaluated based on a subjective standard (i.e., what did the specific person who initiated the specific sexual act conclude?). A verbal “no” (or words equivalent to “no”) or the nonverbal communication of “no,” even if it sounds insincere or indecisive, always means that Consent has not been communicated, or if previously communicated has been withdrawn. The absence of a verbal “no” does not necessarily mean that Consent has been communicated. Because interpreting non-verbal actions may lead to misunderstanding and a violation of this policy, persons subject to this policy are strongly encouraged to err on the side of caution and not rely solely on the non-verbal actions of another person in concluding that the other person has communicated Consent. The University urges persons subject to this policy to communicate with one another before engaging in a sexual act to ensure that they both wish to engage in the same sexual act.

The definition of Consent for the purposes of criminal law in the State of Tennessee is explained in Appendix E. The information provided in this policy concerning Tennessee law is provided in accordance with the Clery Act. It is not intended, nor should it be construed, as legal advice.

Consent cannot be obtained by or inferred from:

  • Silence that is not accompanied by non-verbal actions conveying an agreement to engage in a particular sexual act;
  • Consent communicated by the other person on a previous occasion;
  • Consent communicated to another person;
  • The other person's failure to resist physical force (however, for purposes of this policy, the other person's resistance to physical force will be
  • Viewed as a clear demonstration that the person has not communicated Consent);
  • The sexual arousal of the other person;
  • A current or previous dating, romantic, intimate, or sexual relationship with the other person;
  • Currently or previously cohabitating with the other person;
  • The other person's attire;
  • The other person's reputation;
  • The other person's giving or acceptance of gifts; or
  • The other person's extension or acceptance of an invitation to go to a private residence, room, or location.

Consent must be Voluntary

Consent is not voluntary if it is obtained by Coercion. Nor is Consent voluntary if it is obtained from a person who is Incapacitated if one knows (or a Reasonable Person would know) that the other person is Incapacitated. Because the Incapacitation of another person may be difficult for one to discern, persons subject to this policy are strongly encouraged to err on the side of caution (i.e., when in doubt, assume that the other person is Incapacitated and therefore unable to give Consent.)

Consent Must be Continual

Consent must be continual, i.e., consent must exist from the beginning to the end of each sexual encounter and for each specific sexual act that occurs during a sexual encounter. A person has a right to change his/her mind; thus, Consent to engage in a specific sexual act may be withdrawn by a person at any time. A withdrawal of Consent is communicated through clear words and/or clear non-verbal actions that indicate that a person no longer agrees to engage in a specific sexual act. Once a person's withdrawal of Consent has been communicated, the other person must cease the specific sexual act and must obtain Consent before reinitiating the specific sexual act. Consent is automatically withdrawn when a person becomes incapacitated. Consent to one type of Sexual Contact or Sexual Intercourse (e.g., oral intercourse) does not constitute or imply Consent for another type of Sexual Contact or Sexual Intercourse (e.g., vaginal intercourse), whether during a sexual encounter or during a previous sexual encounter. The University urges persons subject to this policy to communicate with one another throughout a sexual encounter to ensure that any progression of sexual activity is done with Consent.

File a Complaint

Staff, faculty, students, medical residents, post docs, applicants for employment or patients may raise complaints of discrimination, harassment, and violations of policy with the Office of Equity and Diversity (OED). Individuals who feel they are being treated unfairly because of a protected status or in retaliation for engaging in a protected activity, or individuals who believe they are subjected to behavior that rises to the level of violating UT policy are encouraged to contact OED to arrange a confidential appointment with an appropriate staff member to discuss their concerns.

Information about UTHSC’s complaint procedure and more is also accessible on our File a Complaint page.

Know Your IX

Founded in 2013, Know Your IX  is a national survivor-run, student-driven campaign to end campus sexual violence.  Running on grassroots energy, we educate students across the country about their civil right to education free from sexual violence and harassment while also pushing policy and legislative change on the national level for better federal enforcement of that same right. 

To increase your understanding of Title IX there is a YouTube video KNOW YOUR IX that will enhance your knowledge and understanding of this landmark federal civil rights law.

Last Published: Mar 19, 2019