Native American Indian & Alaska Native Heritage Month


Native American Indian & Alaska Native Heritage Month

The first American Indian Day in a state was declared on the second Saturday in May 1916 by the governor of N.Y. Several states celebrate the fourth Friday in September. In Illinois, for example, legislators enacted such a day in 1919.

Presently, several states have designated Columbus Day as Native American Day, but it continues to be a day we observe without any recognition as a national legal holiday. In 1990 President George H. W. Bush approved a joint resolution designating November 1990 "National American Indian Heritage Month." Similar proclamations have been issued each year since 1994.

For information about Native American Indian & Alaska Native Heritage Month, please visit the Library of Congress's About Native American Heritage Month site.

UTHSC Native American Indian & Alaska Native Heritage Film Festival

(please register on the HR 128 portal, seating is limited)


aloe plant

Film #1 - Native American Healing-21st Century
Tuesday, November 1, 2011
2:00 pm – 3:30pm
Madison Plaza Conference Room (C-1, 930)


Native American Healing-21st Century looks at the ancient health and healing methods of American Indians. It discusses the invaluable contributions the Native Americans made to our early frontier heritage and shows how many of those same healing plants and herbs are an important source of today's modern methods of maintaining health.


Native American school

Film #2 - Our Spirits Don't Speak English: Indian Boarding School
Tuesday, November 15, 2011
2:00 pm – 3:30pm
Madison Plaza Conference Room (C-1, 930)


Our Spirits Don't Speak English: Indian Boarding School is a Native American perspective on Indian Boarding Schools. This documentary produced by Rich-Heape Films, Inc. uncovers the dark history of U.S. Government policy which took Indian children from their homes, forced them into boarding schools and enacted a policy of educating them in the ways of Western Society. This documentary gives a voice to the countless Indian children forced through a system designed to strip them of their Native American culture, heritage and traditions.


aloe plant

Film #3 - Trail of Tears: Cherokee Legacy
Wednesday, November 30, 2011
11:00am – 1:00pm
Madison Plaza Conference Room (C-1, 930)


The Trail of Tears: Cherokee Legacy is a documentary by director Chip Richie. It presents the history of the forcible removal and relocation of Cherokee people from southeastern states of the United States to territories west of the Mississippi River, particularly to the Indian Territory in the future Oklahoma.