Graduate Orthodontic Program Course Descriptions

DSCI 659-Radiology and Cephalometrics. The course provides a thorough understanding of craniofacial radiographic techniques with emphasis on cephalometric roentgenography. The course is designed to acquaint the student with the use of radiographs, radiation hygiene, radiographic evidence of pathology, and cephalometric techniques to assure proficiency in technical skills and in interpretation as needed for diagnostic procedures. This course consists of lecture and laboratory instruction.

ORTH 655-Clinical Specialty Seminars I. This course is a companion to clinical training in orthodontics and involves faculty and student evaluations of historically significant as well as contemporary orthodontic literature. All of the current research articles in the key journals in orthodontics are reviewed as they are published. Key historical literature is presented in lecture format by the graduate students based on readings compiled by the faculty. The students are also exposed to the historical development of orthodontics, additional treatment philosophies through guest speakers, and new developments in treatment.

ORTH 786-Scientific Writing: Thesis. The theory and practice of writing a scientifically based thesis are presented. The purpose, structure, and style of all the parts of a thesis are described. The practical application of this series of lectures is the development of the student's thesis.

ORTH 840-Special Topics. Directed readings or special course in topics of current interest. Student will select a specific topic. Approval must be obtained from student's advisor and course instructor prior to enrollment.

ORTH 857-TMD and Occlusal Concepts. Orthodontic treatment has many ramifications for the stomatognathic system. The temporomandibular joint depends on proper occlusion for health and function. This course requires the student to read the appropriate literature, understand the intricacies of the interrelationship of the occlusion and the TMJ, and apply these principles to the correction of orthodontic malocclusion.

ORTH 858-Orthodontic History and Ethics. This course is an introduction to the history of the development of the specialty of orthodontics, with an emphasis on the personalities involved in the development and evolution of the specialty. There are also ethical dilemmas in orthodontics that are discussed and studied.

BIOE 811-Biostatistics for the Health Sciences I. The first semester material includes descriptive statistics, estimation, and one and two sample hypothesis testing, including paired and unpaired situations. Instruction includes assisting the student attain mastery-level skill in data entry and use of SAS software system for statistical analysis of data on the UT VAX. September through December.

DSCI 600-Head and Neck Anatomy. Detailed study of anatomic structures fundamental to dental specialty training, principally through prosections and dissections. Emphasis is on functional (rather than architectural) relationships as they relate to growth, development, and clinical treatment. Included are lectures on osteology of the skull, innervation and blood supply of the face, muscles of facial expression and mastication, and anatomy of the oral cavity. February and March.

DSCI 610-Graduate Oral Biology. This course provides the graduate student with an expanded knowledge of physiological and biochemical principles in and about oral function. Topics are selected to develop an awareness of the oral environment as an integral part of a whole unit of function. Lectures are concerned with the molecular structure and biologic function of the Extracelluar Matrix, gene alteration in connective tissue disorders, composition and anatomy of bone and cartilage, including factors affecting remodeling and repair, pathogenesis of degenerative TMD disorders, all aspects of wound healing, to include the role of cytokines, growth factors, integrins, and metalloproteinases. The embryology and development of tooth development, eruption, histology of the pulp, pain transmission, facial development, classic signs of inflammation, cell types and function in the host response, significance of the "bio-film" concept, salivary function and related disorders, awareness of recent developments in understanding oral cancer, the role of enkephalins and endorphins in the management of pain and stress in dental patients.

DSCI 653-Human Growth and Development. This course provides an overview of the events of human growth and the analytic approaches used to study growth, particularly from birth to adulthood. Discussions center around the nature of growth, mechanisms of growth, general body development, and genetic and environmental influences on growth. Emphasis is given to the head and neck region. First half of semester.

ORTH 667-Clinical Specialty Seminars II. This course is a companion to clinical training in orthodontics and involves faculty and student evaluations of historically significant as well as contemporary orthodontic literature. All of the current research articles in the key journals in orthodontics are reviewed as they are published. Key historical literature is presented in lecture format by the graduate students based on readings compiled by the faculty. The students are also exposed to the historical development of orthodontics, additional treatment philosophies through guest speakers, and new developments in treatment.

ORTH 755-Craniofacial Growth. Topics in growth malformations and dysplasias are presented. The etiology, presentation, differential diagnosis, and orthodontic treatment of comparatively common pharyngeal arch syndromes and sequences are described, with extended discussion of cleft lip and palate. Second half of semester.

ORTH 785-Scientific Writing: Thesis Protocol. The theory and practice of preparing a sound protocol preparatory to thesis-level research is discussed in detail. Various research designs are discussed. Additionally, style and content of a grant proposal are reviewed.

ORTH 789-Independent Research. This course encompasses the activities necessary to conduct an original research project pertinent to the general field of craniofacial biology or the specific discipline of orthodontics. It involves the development of a problem, the writing of a formal research proposal including a full literature review, statement of material and methods, and the execution of the research and appropriate analysis and interpretation of data. Second half of semester.

ORTH 856-Craniofacial Anomalies. The orthodontic graduate student must be trained to deal with and to competently treat patients who present with various skeletal and dental anomalies. This course’s purpose is to cover the literature on the various syndromes and developmental anomalies that affect the teeth and the face. Visiting lecturers from across the spectrum of healthcare delivery address the class and explain the intricacies of dealing with these problems from the perspective of their respective specialty.

DSCI 705-Advanced Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology. A course on pathology of the jaws and contiguous soft tissues and their relationship to systemic disease. Special emphasis is placed on developing a logical approach to clinical, roentgenographic, and histopathologic diagnosis; the relationships between local and systemic disease; and consideration for appropriate treatment. July and August.

DSCI 717-Orthodontics-Periodontics Seminar. This seminar course is conducted by members of the Orthodontics and Periodontology faculties. Included are lectures on the interrelationships of orthodontic and periodontic approaches to common treatment situations. Emphasis is placed on the basic science mechanisms underlying periodontic and orthodontic therapies. Selected literature of common interest to the students of Orthodontics and Periodontics is reviewed. Graduate students present cases for diagnosis and treatment planning as well as cases treated in an interdisciplinary manner. The purpose of this seminar is to encourage greater interaction and understanding between orthodontist and periodontist, including the identification of patients to be treated jointly by graduate students in orthodontics and periodontics. July through September.

ORTH 762-Biomaterials for Orthodontics. This course provides the student with a basic knowledge of the materials used in orthodontics. New developments in materials science and their relationships to the properties of materials important for orthodontic use are reviewed. The course requires successful completion of a research project and reporting this project in a formal report. September through December.

ORTH 767-Clinical Specialty Seminars III. This course is a companion to clinical training in orthodontics and involves faculty and student evaluations of historically significant as well as contemporary orthodontic literature. All of the current research articles in the key journals in orthodontics are reviewed as they are published. Key historical literature is presented in lecture format by the graduate students based on readings compiled by the faculty. The students are also exposed to the historical development of orthodontics, additional treatment philosophies through guest speakers, and new developments in treatment.

ORTH 895-Independent Research. This course involves performance of an original research project leading to completion of the MS thesis.

ORTH 768-Clinical Specialty Seminars IV. This course is a companion to clinical training in orthodontics and involves faculty and student evaluations of historically significant as well as contemporary orthodontic literature. All of the current research articles in the key journals in orthodontics are reviewed as they are published. Key historical literature is presented in lecture format by the graduate students based on readings compiled by the faculty. The students are also exposed to the historical development of orthodontics, additional treatment philosophies through guest speakers, and new developments in treatment.

ORTH 896-Independent Research. This course involves performance of an original research project leading to completion of the MS thesis.

LBC 711-Effective Oral Communication Skills. Skills in oral presentation of scientific data will be developed through student reports from the appropriate literature with evaluation of performance emphasizing improvement in communication skills. Each student will make two presentations, which are videotaped and critiqued by the class and instructors. Preparation of effective visuals will be required as part of each presentation. Each student must obtain agreement from a faculty member who will serve as content expert and who must attend the student's two presentations.

DSCI 800-Thesis. Upon achieving candidate status, this course must be elected. The preparation of the thesis is finalized, the results presented, and the oral defense is conducted under this course number.

ORTH 867-Clinical Specialty Seminars V. This course is a companion to clinical training in orthodontics and involves faculty and student evaluations of historically significant as well as contemporary orthodontic literature. All of the current research articles in the key journals in orthodontics are reviewed as they are published. Key historical literature is presented in lecture format by the graduate students based on readings compiled by the faculty. The students are also exposed to the historical development of orthodontics, additional treatment philosophies through guest speakers, and new developments in treatment.

ORTH 868-Clinical Specialty Seminars VI. This course is a companion to clinical training in orthodontics and involves faculty and student evaluations of historically significant as well as contemporary orthodontic literature. All of the current research articles in the key journals in orthodontics are reviewed as they are published. Key historical literature is presented in lecture format by the graduate students based on readings compiled by the faculty. The students are also exposed to the historical development of orthodontics, additional treatment philosophies through guest speakers, and new developments in treatment.

ORTH 888-Scientific Writing: The Journal Article. Students receive instruction on writing a research article and preparing the manuscript for submission to a professional journal. Topics consist of essential tools for scientific writing, the structural components of a journal article, writing techniques, design of tables and illustrations, critical and editorial scrutiny of the manuscript, and the journal publishing process. The completed, publishable manuscript becomes an appendix to the student's thesis. Prerequisite: possession of a recently completed research project conducted in-residence (i.e., the graduate student's thesis) judged by the supervising faculty member to be worthy of publication.

Orthodontics room

Contact Us

Graduate Orthodontic Program
875 Union Avenue
Memphis, Tennessee 38163
Phone: 901-448-6214
Fax: 901-448-8358

Program Director:
Terry M. Trojan, D.D.S., M.S.

A division of the College of Dentistry