Specialty Profile

Select any one of the following specialties to learn more information about this field. Our goal is provide you with details specific to UTHSC College of Medicine such as contact information for program directors and interest group leaders as well as special opportunities related to each field that may help you explore your interests further. If you are interested in a subspecialty and there is no information listed, refer to the Department Contacts page to schedule an appointment with the faculty advisor listed for that specialty.

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NOTE: Much of the information provided here can be found on the AAMC Careers in Medicine website as well as CiM websites at other universities. We appreciate the efforts made by these groups to assist students in making the best decisions when it comes to his/her professional goals.


Anesthesiology

An anesthesiologist is a medical specialist who makes all the medical decisions about anesthetizing a patient for surgery and who is responsible for the safety and well-being of the patient before, during, and immediately following the surgical procedure. This includes maintaining the patient in a state of controlled unconsciousness (while under general anesthesia), providing pain relief and monitoring the patient's critical life functions (breathing, hear rate and heart rhythm, blood pressure, body temperature, blood oxygen saturation) as they are affected throughout surgical, obstetrical or other medical procedures.

Match type:Regular

Match rate (US senior): No available data

Residency training requirements: 1 year internship (transitional, medicine or surgery); 3 Years residency

Anesthesiologists can receive training in the following subspecialties:

  • Critical Care Medicine - diagnoses, treats and supports patients with multiple organ dysfunction.
  • Pain Medicine - provides a high level of care for patients experiencing problems with acute, chronic and/or cancer pain.
  • Pediatric Anesthesiology - preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative anesthetic care of children and adolescents.
  • Hospice and Palliative Medicine focuses on the study and treatment of patients living with life-threatening or severe advanced illness expected to lead to death. Comprehensive, specialized care -- including physical (primarily pain and symptom management), psychological, and spiritual -- is provided by an interdisciplinary team to patients and their families to help alleviate suffering and promote quality of life.

Research recommended: No available data
Interest group: None
Department contact: Anethesiology Contacts

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Office of Student Affairs

910 Madison Ave, #1043
Memphis, TN 38163
Phone: (901) 448-5684
Fax: (901) 448-7085

Associate Dean

Owen P. Phillips, M.D.

Executive Dean:
David M. Stern, M.D.


Dermatology

A dermatologist is trained to diagnose and treat pediatric and adult patients with benign and malignant disorders of the skin (including skin cancers, melanomas and moles), mouth, external genitalia, hair and nails, as well as a number of sexually transmitted diseases.

Match type: Regular

Match rate (US senior):63%

Residency training requirements: 1 year internship (transitional, medicine or surgery); 3 Years residency

Dermatologists can receive training in the following subspecialties:

  • Dermatopathology diagnoses and monitors diseases of the skin including infectious, immunologic, degenerative and neoplastic diseases.
  • Pediatric Dermatology specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of skin diseases affecting infants, children and adolescents (up to 18 years of age).

Research recommended: Yes
Interest group: None
Department contact: Dermatology Contacts
Acknowledgements/Sources: AAMC Careers in Medicine
Source: The American Board of Medical Specialties

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Emergency Medicine

An emergency physician is a physician who works at an emergency department to care for acutely ill patients. The emergency physician is a specialist in advanced cardiac life support (advanced life support in Europe), trauma care such as fractures and soft tissue injuries, and management of other life-threatening situations. Emergency physicians are trained to recognize, evaluate, care for, and stabilize a generally diversified population of adult and pediatric patients in response to acute illness and injury.

Match type: Regular

Match rate (US senior): 93%

Residency training requirements: 1 year internship (transitional, emergency medicine); 2-3 Years residency

Emergency physicians can receive training in the following subspecialties:

  • Medical toxicology uses special knowledge to evaluate and manage patients with accidental or purposeful poisoning through drugs and toxins
  • Pediatric emergency medicine has special qualifications to manage emergencies in infants and children.
  • Sports medicine deals with the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of injuries sustained in athletic endeavors.
  • Undersea and hyperbaric medicine deals with the therapeutic use of high environmental oxygen pressure and the prevention of injury and illness due to exposure to environments with elevated ambient pressure.
  • Hospice and Palliative Medicine focuses on the study and treatment of patients living with life-threatening or severe advanced illness expected to lead to death. Comprehensive, specialized care -- including physical (primarily pain and symptom management), psychological, and spiritual -- is provided by an interdisciplinary team to patients and their families to help alleviate suffering and promote quality of life.

Research recommended: Yes
Interest group: Emergency Medicine Interest Group
Department contact: Emergency Medicine Contacts
Acknowledgements/Sources: AAMC Careers in Medicine, Society for Academic Medicine

Source: The American Board of Medical Specialties, the American College of Emergency Physician

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Family Medicine

A family physician is concerned with the total health care of the individual and the family, and is trained to diagnose and treat a wide variety of ailments in patients of all ages. Special emphasis is placed on prevention and the primary care of entire families, utilizing consultations and community resources. More patient visits are made to family physicians than to any other type of physician.

Match type: Regular

Match rate (US senior): 93%

Residency training requirements: 1 year internship (family medicine); 2 Years residency

Family physicians can receive training in the following subspecialties:

  • Geriatric Medicine - special knowledge of the aging process and special skills in the diagnostic, therapeutic, preventive and rehabilitative aspects of illness in the elderly.
  • Sports Medicine deals with the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of injuries sustained in athletic endeavors.
  • Women's Health requires special knowledge of gynecological illness including office procedures and/or obstetrical care including office practice, vaginal deliveries and cesarean deliveries.
  • Emergency Medicine as stated above.
  • Wilderness medicine (also known as expedition medicine) is the practice of medicine where definitive care is more than one hour away, and often days to weeks away. The practice of wilderness medicine is defined by difficult patient access, limited equipment, and environmental extremes.
  • Occupational Health is the promotion and maintenance of the highest degree of physical, mental and social well-being of workers in all occupations by preventing departures from health, controlling risks and the adaptation of work to people, and people to their jobs.
  • Adolescent Medicine
  • Hospice and Palliative Medicine focuses on the study and treatment of patients living with life-threatening or severe advanced illness expected to lead to death. Comprehensive, specialized care -- including physical (primarily pain and symptom management), psychological, and spiritual -- is provided by an interdisciplinary team to patients and their families to help alleviate suffering and promote quality of life.
  • Sleep Medicine pertains to the study, diagnosis, and treatment of patients with disorders affecting sleep and daytime alertness. The most common sleep disorders are sleep apnea and insomnia. Others include snoring, narcolepsy, sleepwalking, and sleep-related seizures.

Research recommended: Recommended

Interest group: UTHSC Family Medicine Interest Group

Department contact: Family Medicine contact information

Additional Information:

Acknowledgements/Sources

Source: The American Board of Medical Specialties, the American Academy of Family Physicians

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Internal Medicine

This specialty provides long-term comprehensive care in the office and the hospital, managing both common and complex illness of adolescents, adults and the elderly. Internists are trained in the diagnosis and treatment of cancer, infections, and diseases affecting the heart, blood, kidneys, joints and digestive, respiratory and vascular systems. They are also trained in the essentials of primary care internal medicine which incorporates an understanding of disease prevention, wellness, substance abuse, mental health and effective treatment of common problems of the eyes, ears, skin, nervous system, and reproductive organ.

Match type: Regular

Match rate (US senior): 98%

Residency training requirements: 1 year internship (internal medicine); 2 Years residency

Internists can receive training in the following subspecialties:

  • Adolescent Medicine concentrates on the unique health care needs of adolescents.
  • Allergy and Immunology deals with the diagnosis and treatment of disorders of the immune system. Conditions can include asthma as well as allergies to food, medications, pollen.
  • Cardiovascular Disease refers to the class of diseases that involve the heart or blood vessels (arteries and veins). While the term technically refers to any disease that affects the cardiovascular system, it is usually used to refer to those related to atherosclerosis (arterial disease).
  • Clinical Cardiac Electrophysiology (also referred to as clinical cardiac electrophysiology , Arrhythmia Services , or electrophysiology), is a branch of the medical specialty of cardiology/cardiac surgery concerned with the study and treatment of rhythm disorders of the heart. Cardiologists with expertise in this area are usually referred to as electrophysiologists. Electrophysiologists are trained in the mechanism, function, and performance of the electrical activities of the heart. Electrophysiologists work closely with other cardiologists and cardiac surgeons to assist or guide therapy for heart rhythm disturbances (arrhythmias).They are trained to perform interventional and surgical procedures to treat cardiac arrhythmia.
  • Critical Care Medicine is concerned with the provision of life support or organ support systems in patients who are critically ill and who usually require intensive monitoring.
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes & Metabolism treats disorders of the endocrine system, including the thyroid and adrenal glands, which help control the body's metabolic activity. Conditions include diabetes, nutritional and metabolic disorders, and bone disorders such as osteoporosis.
  • Gastroenterology is the branch of medicine where the digestive system and its disorders are studied.
  • Geriatric Medicine is the branch of medicine that focuses on health promotion and the prevention and treatment of disease and disability in later life.
  • Hematology is the branch of biology (physiology), pathology, clinical laboratory, internal medicine, and pediatrics that is concerned with the study of blood, the blood-forming organs, and blood diseases. Hematology includes the study of etiology, diagnosis, treatment, prognosis, and prevention of blood diseases.
  • Hospice and Palliative Medicine focuses on the study and treatment of patients living with life-threatening or severe advanced illness expected to lead to death. Comprehensive, specialized care -- including physical (primarily pain and symptom management), psychological, and spiritual -- is provided by an interdisciplinary team to patients and their families to help alleviate suffering and promote quality of life.
  • Infectious Disease is a clinically evident disease resulting from the presence of pathogenic microbial agents, including viruses, bacteria, fungi, protozoa, multicellular parasites, and aberrant proteins known as prions. These pathogens are able to cause disease in animals and/or plants.
  • Interventional Cardiology is a branch of the medical specialty of cardiology that deals specifically with the catheter based treatment of structural heart diseases.
  • Nephrology concerns itself with the diagnosis and treatment of kidney diseases including electrolyte disturbances and hypertension, and the care of those requiring renal replacement therapy, including dialysis and renal transplant patients. Many diseases affecting the kidney are not limited to the organ itself, but are systemic disorders, and may require not only a whole patient approach, but also special treatment, such as systemic vasculitides or other autoimmune diseases, such as lupus. A nephrologist is a physician who has been trained in the diagnosis and management of kidney disease, by regulating blood pressure, regulating electrolytes, balancing fluids in the body, and administering dialysis.
  • Oncology is the branch of medicine that studies tumors (cancer) and seeks to understand their development, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention.
  • Pulmonary Disease is the specialty that deals with diseases of the lungs and the respiratory tract.
  • Rheumatology is a sub-specialty in internal medicine and pediatrics, devoted to the diagnosis and therapy of rheumatic diseases. Rheumatologists mainly deal with clinical problems involving joints, soft tissues and allied conditions of connective tissues.
  • Sleep Medicine pertains to the study, diagnosis, and treatment of patients with disorders affecting sleep and daytime alertness. The most common sleep disorders are sleep apnea and insomnia. Others include snoring, narcolepsy, sleepwalking, and sleep-related seizures.
  • Sports Medicine specializes in preventing, diagnosing and treating injuries related to participating in sports and/or exercise, specifically the rotation or deformation of joints or muscles caused by engaging in such physical activities.
  • Transplant Hepatology

Research recommended: Recommended

Interest group: None

Department Contact: Internal Medicine Contacts

Acknowledgements/Sources: AAMC Careers in Medicine

Source: The American Board of Medical Specialties, the American College of Physicians

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Combined Internal Medicine/Pediatrics

Medicine-Pediatrics is a combined medical specialty. Its purpose is to train a doctor in both Internal Medicine and Pediatrics.

Match type: Regular

Match rate (US senior): No data available

Residency training requirements: 4 years residency (2 years pediatrics; 2 years internal medicine)

Research recommended: No

Interest group: Pediatrics Student Association

Department contact: MedPeds

Acknowledgements/Sources: AAMC Careers in Medicine

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Neurological Surgery

Neurosurgery is the medical specialty concerned with the diagnosis and treatment of of patients with injury to, or diseases/disorders of the brain, spinal cord and spinal column, and peripheral nerves within all parts of the body. The specialty of neurosurgical care includes both adult and pediatric patients. Dependent upon the nature of the injury or disease a neurological surgeon may provide surgical and/or non-surgical care.

Match type: Neurosurgery Residency Matching Program (SF Match); Early match

Match rate (US senior): 79%

Residency training requirements: 2 years internship (general surgery); 6 years residency

Neurosurgeons can receive training in the following subspecialties:

  • Pediatric neurosurgery specializes in neuorsurgical care of pediatric patients.

Research recommended: Yes

Interest group: None

Department contact: Neurosurgery Contacts

Acknowledgements/Sources: AAMC Careers in Medicine, American Association of Neurological Surgeons, American Board of Neurological Surgery, Congress of Neurological Surgeons, Society of Neurological Surgeons

Source: The American Board of Medical Specialties and the Association of American Medical Colleges

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Neurology

Neurology is the medical specialty concerned with the diagnosis and treatment of nervous system disorders, including diseases of the brain, spinal cord, nerves, and muscles.

Match type: Regular

Match rate (US senior): 96%

Residency training requirements: 1 year internship (internal medicine/neurology); 3 years residency

Neurologists can receive training in the following subspecialties:

  • Child Neurology - specializes in the diagnosis and management of neurologic conditions in children.
  • Clinical Neurophysiology specializes in the diagnosis and management of central, peripheral, and autonomic nervous system disorders using a combination of clinical evaluation and electrophysiologic testing such as electroencephalography (EEG), electromyography (EMG), and nerve conduction studies (NCS), among others.
  • Pain Medicine provides a high level of care, either as a primary physician or consultant, for patients experiencing problems with acute, chronic or cancer pain in both hospital and ambulatory settings.

Research recommended: Yes

Interest group: Student Interest Group in Neurology (SIGN)

Department contact: Neurology Contacts

Acknowledgements/Sources: AAMC Careers in Medicine, American Association of Neurological Surgeons, American Board of Neurological Surgery, Congress of Neurological Surgeons, Society of Neurological Surgeons

Source: The American Board of Medical Specialties, the American Academy of Neurology.

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Obstetrics & Gynecology

Physicians in this specialty are trained in the medical and surgical care of the female reproductive system and associated medical problems. They also care for patients during pregnancy and deliver babies.

Match type: Regular

Match rate (US senior): 96%

Residency training requirements: 4 years residency

Obstetrician-gynecologists can receive training in the following subspecialties (most fellowships are 3-4 years):

  • Critical Care Medicine is concerned with the provision of life support or organ support systems in patients who are critically ill and who usually require intensive monitoring.
  • Gynecologic Oncology is concerned focuses the diagnosis and treatment of women with cancer of the reproductive organs, specifically cancer of the ovary, endometrium, uterus, cervix, vagina, vulva and trophoblastic disease.
  • Hospice and Palliative Medicine focuses on the study and treatment of patients living with life-threatening or severe advanced illness expected to lead to death. Comprehensive, specialized care -- including physical (primarily pain and symptom management), psychological, and spiritual -- is provided by an interdisciplinary team to patients and their families to help alleviate suffering and promote quality of life.
  • Maternal and Fetal Medicine cares for, or provides consultation on, patients with complications of pregnancy.
  • Reproductive Endocrinology/Infertility subspecialty where reproductive endocrinologists are skilled in dealing with the endocrine system, which includes the pituitary, thyroid, parathyroid, adrenal glands, placenta, ovaries and testicles.
  • Urogynecology and Pelvic Surgery specializes in the care of women with pelvic floor dysfunction.

Research recommended: Not necessary for competitiveness for residency but is encouraged for competitiveness for fellowships. Research is required in most residency programs.

Interest group: Ob/Gyn Student Interest Group

Opportunities: Shadowing opportunities: In Memphis, call Dr. Tom Elmore at 448-4775. In Chattanooga, a summer research opportunity is available gathering data on existing research projects. Fourth year electives: see departmental websites. Employment opportunities in Memphis, labor and delivery: Contact Drenda Pullen at dpullen@the-med.org or 545-7345.

Department contact: OBGYN Contacts and Additional Information

Acknowledgements/Sources: AAMC Careers in Medicine, American Board of Obstetrics & Gynecology, American College of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Association of Professors in Gynecology and Obstetrics Source: The American Board of Medical Specialties, the American College of Obstetrics & Gynecology, and the "2003 Physician Compensation Survey," Modern Healthcare. July 21, 2003. (Based on surveys conducted by American Medical Group Association; Goddard Healthcare Consulting; Hay Group; Hospital & Healthcare Compensation Service; Martin, Fletcher; MD Network; Medical Group Management Association; Merritt, Hawkins & Associates; Sullivan, Cotter & Associates; and Warren Surveys.)

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Ophthalmology

Ophthalmologists are concerned with the structure, functions, and diseases of the eye. Conditions include cataracts, glaucoma, and conjunctivitis, among others.

Match type: Regular

Match rate (US senior): 82%

Residency training requirements: 1 year internship (internal medicine, surgery or transitional); 3 years residency

Ophthalmologists can receive training in the following subspecialties:

  • Pediatric Ophthalmology. The bulk of pediatric ophthalmic practice involves the medical and surgical management of strabismus, amblyopia, genetic and developmental abnormalities and a wide range of inflammatory, traumatic and neoplastic conditions occurring in the first two decades of life. This subspecialty also deals with the ocular manifestations of certain systemic disorders. Pediatric ophthalmologists frequently treat adult ocular motility disorders as well.
  • Retina refers to the light sensitive nerve tissue in the eye that converts images from the eye's optical system into electrical impulses that are sent along the optic nerve to the brain.
  • Glaucoma. This subspecialty includes the treatment of glaucoma and other disorders that may cause specific types of ophthalmic damage, usually associated with increased intraocular pressure and ultimately manifesting typical optic nerve changes. This area involves the medical and surgical care of both pediatric and adult patients, including new laser applications and implantation of drainage devices.
  • Neuro-ophthalmology. Involving the relationship between neurologic and ophthalmic diseases, neuro-ophthalmology also deals with local pathology affecting the optic nerve and visual pathways. Over 50 percent of all intracranial lesions involve the visual or oculomotor pathways. Neuro-ophthalmology is generally practiced as a nonsurgical subspecialty but can be combined with surgery of the eye and orbit.
  • Uveitis and Ocular Immunology. The term "uveitis" describes inflammation of the middle layer of the eye, which consists of the iris, the ciliary body and the choroid. This subspecialty involves the medical diagnosis and management of immune-mediated conditions of the eye. A subspecialist in this field has advanced training in ocular immunomodulatory therapy and frequently works closely with rheumatology and immunology specialists.
  • Cornea and External Disease. This subspecialty involves the diagnosis and management of diseases of the cornea, sclera, conjunctiva and eyelids, including corneal dystrophies, microbial infections, conjunctival and corneal tumors, inflammatory processes and anterior ocular manifestations of systemic diseases. Training in this area frequently includes corneal transplant surgery and corneal refractive surgery to correct refractive errors.
  • Cataract and Refractive Surgery. A relatively new subspecialty within ophthalmology, this field involves the surgical management of refractive errors in the human eye. Training in this specialty is sometimes included in corneal and external disease fellowships and uses some of the most recent technological advances within the field of ophthalmology.
  • Vitreoretinal Diseases. This subspecialty involves both the medical and surgical treatment of retinal and vitreoretinal disease. The types of diseases treated include manifestations of local, systemic and genetic diseases as they affect the retina and vitreous. Diagnosis involves the use and interpretation of ultrasound, fluorescein angiography and electrophysiology. Treatment methods include laser therapy, cryotherapy, retinal detachment surgery and vitrectomy (removal of the vitreous).
  • Ophthalmic Plastic Surgery. The practice of ophthalmic plastic surgery includes orbital surgery, cosmetic lid surgery and lid and upper facial reconstructive procedures following trauma and tumors. Oculoplastic surgeons combine ophthalmic surgery with plastic surgery and are trained in the use of radiotherapy, chemotherapy and chemosurgery to treat ocular and orbital disease.
  • Ophthalmic Pathology. The ophthalmic pathologist has training in both ophthalmology and pathology, typically in that order. Because of the unique combination of skills involved in this subspecialty, it is usually the ophthalmic pathologist (rather than the general pathologist) who examines tissue specimens from the eye and adnexa.

Research recommended: Yes

Interest group: Student Interest Group in Ophthalmology (SIGIO)

Department Contact Information

Acknowledgements/Sources: AAMC Careers in Medicine, American Academy of Ophthalmology

Source: The American Board of Medical Specialties and the American Academy of Ophthalmology

Orthopaedic Surgery

Orthopaedic surgery is a branch of medicine that focuses on injuries and diseases of the musculoskeletal system (the body's muscles, skeleton, and related tissues), including the spine, joints, ligaments, tendons, and nerves. Conditions treated include cerebral palsy, osteoarthritis, and scoliosis, among others.

Match type: Regular

Match rate (US senior): 79%

Residency training requirements: 5 years residency

Orthopaedic surgeons can receive training in the following subspecialties:

  • Hand Surgery is the specialty focuses on the investigation and treatment of diseases, injuries, or abnormalities affecting the upper extremities. This specialty includes the performance of microvascular surgery, which is necessary for reattachment of amputated fingers or limbs.
  • Sports medicine deals with the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of injuries sustained in athletic endeavors.
  • Pediatric Orthopaedics addresses children with orthopaedic problems including scoliosis, cerebral palsy, congenital dislocation of the hips, clubfoot, and a wide variety of other conditions specifically seen in children-including trauma.
  • Spine Surgery involves caring for patients who have major spine problems as a result of disease, degeneration, or trauma. Orthopaedic spine surgeons frequently work in conjunction with neurosurgeons.
  • Foot and Ankle Orthopaedics is concerned with problems predominantly involving the foot and ankle that are amenable to treatment by both surgical and nonsurgical techniques.
  • Joint Replacement involves taking care of damaged or worn-out joints usually by surgically replacing the joint with an artificial device. The majority of cases involve the hip or knee-and sometimes the ankle or shoulder. Most joint replacement in the hand falls into the area of expertise of the hand surgeons.
  • Trauma Surgery, because of the complex nature of injuries seen today, involves the management of persons with critical or multiple injuries to the musculoskeletal system. This specialty is largely surgical in nature and involves close cooperative efforts with many other specialties in surgery.
  • Oncology enlists the skills of an orthopaedic tumor surgeon who specializes in the management of benign and malignant tumors affecting the musculoskeletal system. Options for treatment have expanded greatly in the past few years with the advent of chemotherapy and radiotherapy coupled with the excision of the tumor and replacement with preserved bone or joint specimens.

Research recommended: Research is highly recommended for competitiveness for residency, but not required. Research is required during residency

Interest group: Orthopaedic Interest Group

Department Contact and Additional Information

Acknowledgements/Sources: AAMC Careers in Medicine

Source: The American Board of Medical Specialties and the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons

Otolaryngology (Head & Neck Surgery)

Orthopaedic (head & neck surgery) provides comprehensive medical and surgical care for patients with diseases and disorders that affect the ears, nose, throat, the respiratory and upper alimentary systems and related structures of the head and neck.

Match type: Regular

Match rate (US senior): 76%

Residency training requirements: 1 year internship (general surgery); 4 years residency

Otolaryngologists can receive training in the following subspecialties:

  • Otology/Neurotology treats diseases of the ear and temporal bone, including disorders of hearing and balance.
  • Pediatric Otolaryngology deals with the diagnosis and treatment of children with diseases of the ear, nose and throat including disorders of voice, speech, language and hearing.

Research recommended: Research is highly recommended for competitiveness for residency, but not required. Research is required during residency

Department Contact and Additional Information

Sources: The American Board of Medical Specialties and the American Academy of Otolaryngology

Pathology (Anatomic & Clinical)

A pathologist uses information gathered from the microscopic examination of tissue specimens, cells, and body fluids, and from clinical laboratory tests on body fluids and secretions for the diagnosis, exclusion and monitoring of disease. According to the American Society for Clinical Pathology, "Pathologists are problem-solvers, fascinated by the process of disease and eager to unlock medical mysteries, like AIDS and diabetes, using the tools of laboratory medicine and its sophisticated instruments and methods. Pathologists make it possible to apply scientific advances to improve the accuracy and efficiency of medical diagnosis and treatment."

Match type: Regular | Match rate (US senior): 91% | Residency training requirements: 4 years residency

Pathologists can receive training in the following subspecialties:

  • Blood Banking/Transfusion Medicine is a branch of medicine that focuses on the collection of blood and its transfusion from one individual to another. The blood is stored in blood banks. Each unit of blood (referred to as whole blood) is separated into multiple components, such as red blood cells, plasma, and platelets, among others, and each of these components can be transfused, depending on an individual's medical needs.
  • Chemical Pathology is the area of pathology that is generally concerned with analysis of bodily fluids.
  • Cytopathology is the branch of general pathology studying the cellular basis of disease. Various normal functions of cell growth, metabolism, and division can fail or work in abnormal ways and lead to various diseases such as cancers.
  • Forensic Pathology is a branch of medicine concerned with determining cause of death usually for civil or criminal law cases.
  • Hematology is a medical science that deals with the diagnosis and treatment of disorders and diseases of the blood, spleen, and lymph glands.
  • Immunopathology is the branch of immunology that deals with pathologies of the immune system
  • Medical Microbiology is a branch of microbiology which deals with the study of microorganisms including bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites which are of medical importance and are capable of causing diseases in human beings.
  • Neuropathology is the study of disease of nervous system tissue, usually in the form of either small surgical biopsies or whole autopsy brains. Neuropathology is a subspecialty of anatomic pathology.
  • Pediatric Pathology
  • Selective Pathology - The term "selective" when used to prefix a pathology fellowship title also tends to imply ACGME accreditation for that fellowship. In other words, not all general surg path/subspecialty surg path fellowships are ACGME-accredited.

Research recommended: No

Interest group: In progress

Department Contact and Additional Information

Pediatrics

Match type: Regular | Match rate (US senior): 95% | Residency training requirements: 3 years residency

Pediatricians can receive training in the following subspecialties:

  • Adolescent medicine is a medical subspecialty that focuses on care of patients who are in the adolescent period of development. Patients have generally entered puberty, which typically begins between the ages of 9 to 11 for girls, and 11 to 13 for boys.
  • Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine is a field of medicine devoted to the care and treatment of infants up to six weeks old. Neonatologists concentrate on the full spectrum of medical problems that can affect newborn babies. Perinatology is a branch of medicine dealing with medical and biological issues that affect the birth of a child. Perinatology combines obstetrics, gynecology and neonatology, and includes treatment of a fetus or a newborn and the mother.
  • Pediatric Cardiology is concerned with the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of heart disease in children.
  • Pediatric Critical Care Medicine
  • Pediatric Emergency Medicine
  • Pediatric Endocrinology
  • Pediatric Gastroenterology
  • Pediatric Hematology-Oncology
  • Pediatric Infectious Diseases
  • Pediatric Nephrology
  • Pediatric Pulmonology
  • Pediatric Rheumatology
  • Pediatric Sports Medicine

Research recommended: No

Interest group: Pediatrics Issues Student Association

Department Contact and Additional Information

Acknowledgements/Sources: AAMC Careers in Medicine

Source: The American Board of Medical Specialties

Plastic Surgery

Plastic surgery deals with the repair, reconstruction, or replacement of physical defects of form or function involving the skin, musculoskeletal system, head and facial structures, hand, extremities, breasts and trunk. A plastic surgeon uses aesthetic surgical principles not only to improve undesirable qualities of normal structures, but in all reconstructive procedures as well.

Match type: Plastic Surgery Residency Match (SF Match); Early match | Match rate (US senior): 55%
Residency training requirements: 5 years general surgery + 3 years plastic surgery

Plastic surgeons can receive training in the following subspecialties:

  • Craniofacial Surgery - reconstructive treatment of disorders of the soft and hard tissues of the face and cranial areas.
  • Surgery of the Hand - expertise in the investigation, preservation, and restoration by medical, surgical and rehabilitative means, of all structures of the hand and wrist

Research recommended: Recommended, not required.

Interest group: None

Department Contact and Additional Information

Acknowledgements/Sources: AAMC Careers in Medicine, UTHSC Division of Plastic Surgery, The American Board of Medical Specialties and the American Society of Plastic Surgeons.

Psychiatry

Psychiatry is the medical specialty concerned with the origin, diagnosis, prevention and treatment of mental disorders. Like other medical illnesses, mental illnesses range from severe and life-threatening disorders, to relatively mild and self-limiting conditions.

Match type: Regular | Match rate (US senior): 96% | Residency training requirements: 4 years residency

Psychiatrists can receive training in the following subspecialties:

  • Addiction psychiatry is the branch of medicine that concentrates on helping people overcome repetitive behaviors that can range from drug and alcohol dependency to tobacco use and eating disorders
  • Child and adolescent psychiatry is the diagnosis and treatment of disorders of thinking, feeling and/or behavior affecting children, adolescents, and their families. BCBSMT Provider Specialty Definitions
  • Forensic psychiatry encompasses the interface between law and psychiatry.
  • Geriatric psychiatry focuses on the care of elderly people with mental illnesses (ie, dementias, post stroke cognitive changes, depression).
  • Pain management (also called pain medicine) is the discipline concerned with the relief of pain. Pain has been described as, "An unpleasant sensory and emotional experience associated with either actual or potential tissue damage.

Research recommended: No

Interest group: Adolph Meyer Society Student Psychiatry Interest Group

Department Contact and Additional Information

Source: The American Board of Medical Specialties and the American Psychiatric Association

Radiology

A radiologist diagnoses and treats diseases utilizing radiologic imaging procedures in adults and children. Physicians practicing in the field of radiology most often specialize in diagnostic radiology, radiation oncology, or radiological physics. A diagnostic radiologist utilizes x-ray, radionuclides, ultrasound, and electromagnetic radiation to diagnose and treat disease. A radiation oncologist deals with the therapeutic applications of radiant energy and its modifiers and the study and management of disease, especially malignant tumors. A radiological physicist deals with the diagnostic and therapeutic applications of roentgen rays, gamma rays from sealed sources, ultrasonic radiation, and radio-frequency radiation, as well as the equipment associated with their production and use, including radiation safety.

Match type: Regular | Match rate (US senior): 84%
Residency training requirements: 1 year internship (internal medicine, surgery or transitional); 4 years residency

Radiologists can receive training in the following subspecialties:

  • Abdominal Radiology
  • Cardiothoracic Radiology
  • Endovascular Surgical Neuroradiology is the clinical subspecialty for the diagnosis and treatment of neurovascular diseases using x-ray fluoroscopy and angiography.
  • Musculoskeletal Radiology
  • Neuroradiology focuses on the diagnosis and characterization of abnormalites of the central nervous system, spine, and head and neck.
  • Nuclear Radiology uses diagnostic test involving the external detection of radioactive waves from radionuclides (radioactive substances injected into a patient or ingested by the patient) in the diagnosis of disease.
  • Pediatric Radiology uses diagnostic tests on children utilizing x-rays.
  • Ultrasound is an imaging method in which high-frequency sound waves are used to outline a part of the body. The sound wave echoes are picked up and displayed on a television screen. Also called ultrasonography.
  • Vascular and Interventional Radiology uses various radiological techniques (such as x-ray, computed tomography (CT) scans, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, and ultrasounds) to place wires, tubes, or other instruments inside a patient to diagnose or treat an array of conditions.

Research recommended: Research is desirable for a residency application and may play a role in how you are ranked. Research is required during the residency.

Department Contact and Additional Information

Source: The American Board of Medical Specialties, the American College of Radiology, and the Radiological Society of North America

Surgery - General

Surgery (from the Greek meaning "hand work") is the medical specialty that treats diseases or injuries by operative manual and instrumental treatment. Surgeons may be physicians, dentists, or veterinarians who specialize in surgery.

Match type: Regular | Match rate (US senior): 81%
Residency training requirements: 1 year internship (surgery); 4 years residency

Surgeons can receive training in the following subspecialties:

  • Hand Surgery demonstrates expertise in the investigation, preservation, and restoration by medical, surgical and rehabilitative means, of all structures of the hand and wrist.
  • Pediatric Surgery demonstrates expertise in surgical conditions in premature and newborn infant, children and adolescents.
  • Surgical Critical Care demonstrates expertise in the critically ill and postoperative patient, particularly the trauma victim and those with multiple organ dysfunctions.
  • Vascular Surgery demonstrates expertise in surgical disorders of the blood vessels, excluding the intracranial vessels or the heart.
  • Colorectal Surgery demonstrates expertise in diseases of the colon, rectum and anus.
  • Minimally invasive surgery demonstrates advanced expertise in minimally invasive surgery and laporoscopy.

Research recommended: Research is recommended. It reflects a student's commitment to pursue an interest and is favorably regarded by the department. But it is not a prerequisite to match within the specialty.

Interest group: Student Surgical Society.

Department Contact and Additional Information

Source: The American Board of Medical Specialties and the American College of Surgeons

Urology

Urology is a surgical specialty which deals with diseases of the male and female urinary tract and the male reproductive organs." This specialist has comprehensive knowledge of, and skills in, endoscopic, percutaneous, and open surgery of congenital and acquired conditions of the urinary and reproductive systems and their contiguous structures.

Match type: American Urological Association (AUA) | Match rate (US senior): 80%
Residency training requirements: 1 year internship (surgery); 4 years residency

Urologists can receive training in the following subspecialties:

  • Pediatric Urology involves all aspects of congenital anomalies, childhood acquired urologic problems and overlapping problems of adolescence.
  • Urological Oncology - training in surgical and medical management of urological cancers (prostate, kidney and testes)
  • Renal transplantation
  • Female urology/voiding dysfunction - training in women's urological problems
  • Laporoscopy/enduroscopy- training in minimally invasive and advanced endourologic procedures
  • Male infertility/andrology
  • Reconstructive/trauma urology

Research recommended: Data unavailable

Interest group: None

Opportunities: Clinical and translational research

Department Contact and Additional Information

Source: The American Board of Medical Specialties, the American Urological Association