Organizational Partners

UTHSC

The University of Tennessee Health Science Center

The University of Tennessee Health Science Center was established in 1911 and accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. The UT Health Science Center (UTHSC) is the flagship statewide academic health system, offering three undergraduate programs, more than 20 graduate degrees, and three professional programs.

Mission: The mission of the UT Health Science Center is to bring the benefits of the health sciences to the achievement and maintenance of human health, with a focus on the citizens of Tennessee and the region, by pursuing an integrated program of education, research, clinical care, and public service. The UTHSC campuses include colleges of Allied Health Sciences, Dentistry, Graduate Health Sciences, Medicine, Nursing and Pharmacy. Patient care, professional education and research are carried out at hospitals and other clinical sites across Tennessee. Endowed professorships, Research Centers of Excellence, and continuing relationships with research and health care facilities across Tennessee ensure that both basic science and applied research stay focused on contemporary health topics.

Facts & Figures

Minority Center of Excellence (COE) – The College of Pharmacy has a new grant for a Center of Excellence for the recruitment and retention of underrepresented minority students and faculty..
Research – During fiscal year 2009, UT Health Science Center faculty and staff received more than $88 million in research funding, including support from National Institutes of Health grants and private foundations.
Regional Biocontainment Laboratory – The $18 million facility, which will serve as a regional resource to advance the fight against infectious diseases, support emergency preparedness efforts, and enhance emergency response capabilities in case of a bioterrorism event, became operational in summer 2009.
Clinical and Translational Science Institute – Committed to funding a recently established CTSI, an interdisciplinary unit conducting research that translates scientific discoveries into clinical applications. Since 2008, the CTSI has awarded $608,700 to eight experienced researchers through the Pilot Projects Program, $693,328 to four junior faculty through the K-12 Scholars Program, and $85,000 to seven pre-doctorate fellows through the T-32 Trainees Program.
Cancer Research Building – Opened in 2007, it is the Mid-South's only adult cancer research facility, housing 32 research laboratories and more than 65 scientists.

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LeMoyne-Owen College

LeMoyne-Owen College

The LeMoyne-Owen College occupies a beautifully landscaped campus at 807 Walker Avenue in South Memphis. The merger of LeMoyne College and Owen College in 1968 joined two institutions, which had rich traditions as private, church-related colleges that have historically served Black students, founded and developed to provide higher education to students in the Mid-South area.

LeMoyne Normal and Commercial School opened officially in 1871, but it actually began in 1862 when the American Missionary Association sent Lucinda Humphrey to open an elementary school for freedmen and runaway slaves to Camp Shiloh soon after the occupation of Memphis by federal troops under General Ulysses S. Grant. The School was moved to Memphis in 1863, but was destroyed by fire in the race riots, which followed the withdrawal of federal troops in 1866. Lincoln Chapel, as the school was then known, was rebuilt and reopened in 1867 with 150 students and six teachers, but the small school was beset by financial problems.

In 1870, Dr. Francis J. LeMoyne, a Pennsylvania doctor and abolitionist, donated $20,000 to the American Missionary Association to build an elementary and secondary school for prospective teachers. The first years were difficult ones, primarily, because of the toll that the yellow fever epidemic took on school personnel, but under the leadership of the third principal, Andrew J. Steele, the institution experienced three decades of growth and development.

In 1914, the school was moved from Orleans Street to its present site on Walker Avenue. In that same year, the first building, Steele Hall, was erected on the new campus. LeMoyne developed rapidly; it became a junior college in 1924 and a four-year college in 1930, chartered by the State of Tennessee just four years later.

Owen College began in 1947, when the Tennessee Baptist Missionary and Educational Convention bought property on Vance Avenue to build a junior college. After several years of planning, the school opened in 1954 as S. A. Owen Junior College, named in honor of a distinguished religious and civic leader, but the name was later changed to Owen Junior College. The merger of Owen and LeMoyne Colleges in 1968 joined two religious traditions at the same time that it reinforced the institutions' shared purpose of combining a liberal arts education with career training in a Christian setting.

Mission: The LeMoyne-Owen College is a private, historically black liberal arts institution, distinguished by diverse faculty, rigorous academic programs, and success in preparing students for professional careers, leadership, and service in the local and global community.

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Memphis and Shelby County Health Department

Memphis and Shelby County Health Department

Mission: To promote, protect and improve the health and environment of all Shelby County residents

Vision: To be the recognized authority for the community's health and environment through policy development advanced technology, active partnerships and a staff of innovative, caring professionals.

The Memphis and Shelby County Health Departments (MSCHD) merged in 1942 and operates jointly under contract funding between the city and county governments. Shelby County contains seven incorporated municipalities (e.g., Memphis, Arlington, Bartlett, Collierville, Germantown, Lakeland, and Millington) and several unincorporated areas. Today this continues, but the Health Department now also depends heavily on funding from state, federal and other governmental grant dollars to supplement the funding provided by tax dollars from the city and county. The Health Department operates under the auspices of the Director of Health and the County Health Officer which are appointed by the County Mayor. Currently, Ms. Yvonne Smith Madlock is the Director and Dr. Kenneth S. Robinson, M.D. is the County Health Officer. Shelby County is the largest county in the State of Tennessee, both geographically (approximately 783 square miles) and in population (909,035). The role of public health has come a long way since the first appropriations by the Board of Health in 1879. Programs of the Health Department today touch every aspect of life - from infectious diseases to rodent control and more recently the planning and preparation for a potential terrorist attack, involving biological, chemicals, nuclear agents and explosives through emergency preparedness. The city's growing population keeps the Memphis and Shelby County Health Department staff very busy promoting, protecting and improving the health and environment for all Shelby County residents and visitors.

Ten Essential Services:

  1. Monitor health status to identify community health problems
  2. Diagnose and investigate health problems and health hazards in the community
  3. Inform, educate and empower people about health issues
  4. Mobilize community partnerships to identify and solve health problems
  5. Develop policies and plans that support individual and community health efforts
  6. Enforce laws and regulations that protect health and ensure safety
  7. Link people to needed personal health services and assure the provision of health care when otherwise unavailable
  8. Assure a competent public health and personal health care workforce
  9. Evaluate effectiveness, accessibility and quality of personal and population-based health services
  10. Research for new insights and innovative solutions to health problems

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Memphis Housing Authority

Memphis Housing Authority

The Federal Housing Authority (FHA) was established in 1934 and a year later, the Memphis Housing Authority was a frontrunner in the public housing movement. Memphis became the second city in the nation, following New York, to establish a local housing authority. Under Chapter 615 of the Private Acts of 1935, the Tennessee General Assembly authorized the Memphis Housing Authority (MHA). Memphis' first two public housing developments (Dixie Homes and Lauderdale Courts) opened on land that was once occupied by slums. As a reflection of the racial policies of the time, Lauderdale Courts was designated for white families and Dixie Homes for black families. In 1954, the enactment of the federal Urban Renewal program greatly expanded MHA's role. Its focus was no longer strictly housing management.

From 1970-1975 the number of public housing units in Memphis increased from nine to twenty-two. The newer units became smaller and the density was cut in half. During that time four high-rises for the elderly were also built. In 1991, Dr. W.W. Herenton became the first African American Mayor of Memphis. One of his primary goals was to increase affordable housing for Memphis citizens. In 1994, the Memphis Housing Authority received a $481,000 HOPE VI planning grant and in 1995 received a $47.2 million HOPE VI implementation grant for the LeMoyne Gardens housing units. The city's first public-private HOPE VI development, LeMoyne Gardens, was renamed to College Park. It hosts 411 apartments and homes for tenants and owners of various income levels. In 2000, the city was awarded a second HOPE VI grant for $35 million from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development for the redevelopment of the historic Greenlaw, Manassas, and surrounding neighborhoods (also known as Uptown). The Uptown Project proposes to transform two public housing developments (Hurt Village and Lauderdale Courts) and create approximately 1000 mixed income units (affordable, public housing, and market rate).

MHA is governed by a seven-member Board of Commissioners, appointed by the Mayor of the City of Memphis and confirmed by the Memphis City Council.

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First Baptist Church Lauderdale

First Baptist Church Lauderdale

First Baptist Church, Lauderdale, first known as First Baptist Beale, was the first African-American Baptist church in the city of Memphis. It first worshipped in a crude shelter known as a "bush arbor" at Main and Beale in 1865. Later it was located at Beale near Lauderdale then Beale near Fourth where a magnificent structure was built at a cost of $100,000. The mortgage was immediately liquidated through the collective efforts of the members under the dynamic leadership of the minister, The Rev. Morris Henderson, a man of great insight, stability and moral fortitude. This building, located at 379 Beale, is listed in the National Records of Historic Preservation. Rev. Henderson, a man whose formal learning ended at the third grade, showed great concern for Christian education. He hired a teacher for his members and paid the teacher a larger salary than his own as pastor.

During this period, First Baptist was the only black Baptist church in the community. About 1890 First Baptist, Lauderdale had visions of a new type of leadership and church program. So, they departed in peace from the old Beale Street Church building, retaining the church charter. The congregation then moved to Zion Hall at 217 Beale. Under the leadership of Rev. W. S. Ellington, an early graduate of Fisk University, the church bought the site on Frazier St., now St. Paul, during the last decade of the nineteenth century.

The character of the church was shaped under the leadership of Dr. T. O. Fuller, who answered the call to the pastorate in 1900. The church at 495 St. Paul was built in 1906. The church remained in that location until 1939, when the Memphis Housing Authority purchased that property. The church then moved to its present location, 682 S. Lauderdale. Under Dr. Fuller's leadership, First Baptist became a local and national center of Baptist life, the meeting place for Baptist ministers, a founding member of the Memphis Congress of Christian Education, and an active participant in all phases of Baptist life. Dr. Fuller was also the president of Howe Institute, a training school for many of the city's ministers. In 1942, a state park was designated for African Americans in West Tennessee, which later became the first state park in the South named for an African-American, in honor of Dr. Fuller after his death. Upon the death of Dr. Fuller in 1942, Dr. James M. Nabrit, Secretary of the National Baptist Convention, U.S.A., Inc., became pastor in 1943.

Dr. H. Clarke Nabrit, son of Dr. J.M. Nabrit, became pastor in 1946 after the death of his father. Under his leadership the church's educational building was erected, and the church's corporate name was changed from "First Colored Baptist Church" to "First Baptist Church Lauderdale." During the Civil Rights era, First Baptist was one of the meeting places for the NAACP and other groups planning strategies for the struggle for justice and human rights.

Dr. Charles L. Dinkins was called as pastor in 1969. Under his leadership, the church's programs were strengthened, and the position of Program Coordinator was developed toward this end. He also expanded First Baptist's involvement in many community organizations, such as MIFA and SCI. In 1982, the church underwent a major remodeling of its physical structure to accommodate a growth in programs.

Following Dr. Dinkins' retirement in 1994, Dr. Noel G. L. Hutchinson, Jr. became pastor in 1995. First Baptist under his leadership has expanded its Christian Education through increased opportunities and attendance at Bible Study. The hallmark of this emphasis has been the Children and Youth Bible study held on Tuesday nights, with an after school tutorial component. First Baptist also started a new generational group, the 21st Century Club, did renovations to the Sanctuary, and purchased additional property at 659 Mississippi that currently serves as the Church Office and computer lab. A separate 501c3 nonprofit entity, Mustard Seed, Inc, was birthed since Rev. Hutchinson's tenure, which now provides many needed services to the immediate community, such as job readiness, computer training, and GED preparation. The church has also been involved in long-range planning efforts looking toward the future.

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Mustard Seed

Mustard Seed

Mustard Seed, Incorporated was chartered in 2000 as a faith-based yet separate organization to expend existing community-outreach initiatives provided by First Baptist Church, Lauderdale. These community-building initiatives focus on the neighborhoods surrounding the church, including the south Memphis zip codes, 38126 and 38106.

Mission: The mission of Mustard Seed, Inc. is to develop and implement programs and services that build capacity in the surrounding community. The five priority capacity-building areas addressed by the organization's ongoing community outreach efforts include: youth and young-adult leadership, personal, and educational development; civic and life-skills development; improvement of overall health status; and economic development. These priorities focus on building neighborhood and youth services.

Current Programs: Mustard Seed, Inc. currently manages the Neighborhood Network. The Neighborhood Network is funded through HUD and is a joint effort between Mustard Seed, Inc., the Memphis Housing Authority, and the City of Memphis Division of Housing and Community Development.

After School Tutorial Program: Program activities are designed to provide academic support and a stable and caring and safe environment for youth. The after-school tutorial is a technology-based program that seeks to help youth who attend Georgia Avenue Elementary, Vance Middle School, and Booker T. Washington High School. The program offers participating youth fun and challenging activities and experiences. Students are provided with tutoring, life-skills training, role modeling of positive behaviors, physical fitness sessions, and nutritionally balanced dinner.

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Le Bonheur Children's Hospital

Le Bonheur Children's Hospital

Meet the CHEER executive leadership board member, Rev. Corey D. Johnson, for Le Bonheur Children's Hospital.

More than 80 years ago, a group of women shared a vision that would save the lives of literally tens of thousands of children. These women began a sewing circle in 1923 called the Le Bonheur Club to make clothing for Memphis's orphans at the Leath Orphanage. As the Le Bonheur Club membership grew, so did its commitment to children. Soon the Club moved beyond clothing orphaned children to attending their health care needs.

By providing transportation to doctors' appointments, these benevolent ladies became well known to local pediatricians. In 1944, when the Pediatric Society dared to dream of a hospital dedicated to children, the Le Bonheur Club was called.

Raising two million dollars was the challenge these industrious women undertook to build the facility, which opened in 1952 as Le Bonheur Children's Hospital. On June 15 of that year, the community gathered to open the doors of the hospital and tie the key to the front door to a balloon and let it float away-symbolizing that our doors would always be open to all children needing medical care.

When it opened, Le Bonheur was called "the most modern" of children's hospitals, "having the latest equipment," by the Daily Press Scimitar. That commitment to excellence continued through Le Bonheur's rich history.

Now, more than 50 years later, the hospital has grown in size and scope. Still bearing the name of its founders, Le Bonheur Children's Hospital has grown to be the premier pediatric health care facility for children throughout the region and is ranked as one of the nation's best hospitals by U.S. News and World Report. Le Bonheur's clinical excellence continues today with the nation's largest surgical brain tumor program and one of the top 10 busiest emergency departments.

With a medical staff of more than 550 pediatricians, Le Bonheur serves the health care needs of children from throughout the United States and the world.

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